Kitano Tenmangu

Kitano Tenmangu

kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu
kitano tenmangu

The monthly flea market at the Kitano Tenmangu shrine is not to be missed if you’re in Kyoto, which is held on the 25th of every month. There is just so much to see and buy!

After an hour’s long bus ride, we hungrily ate our way through the shrine. My firm favourite is oden, introduced by Cheryl, a clear dashi broth where you can add fish balls, crab sticks, daikon and cabbage. Something like yong tau foo, really. Yakisoba is also wrapped in egg here, which may remind my fellow Malaysians of mee goreng pattaya. Lining the shrine’s grounds are rows of stalls selling food and snacks, adorable knickknacks and handicraft, preloved kimono, potted plants, as far as the eye can see.

I purchased another silk kimono piece for only ¥‎1000, just because it was so affordable and would go well with my other set. Silk kimono are very expensive usually hence only worn for special occasions, so they are usually in very good condition. I suggest keep an eye out for rips and stains when purchasing vintage or preloved kimono. Having said so, I’d recommend getting brand new inner kimono pieces for hygienic reasons.

We skipped the plum blossom grove and its ¥600 entrance fee just because there were many plum trees within the shrine itself. It was truly a magnificent sight, especially when the clouds parted to make way for the sun.

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